Tag Archives: cliches

Combating clichéd thinking – change your starting point

cliche writingGiven a fairly unoriginal brief, or a marketing stance that lacks certain imagination, it’s all too natural for clichés to start flooding your mind when you come. So what if you hit that terrible stumbling block when, for everything you try, you keep coming back to the same clichés? Consider that unoriginal starting point, that unimaginative bridge, and reposition yourself. Continue reading

Why disruptive animal adverts don’t work for me

copywriting clichesWe live in a world where advertisers are being encouraged to come up with original branding at all costs. Even if it has nothing to do with the product. FirstDirect are trying to convince us they’re worth using because they’re unexpected (which is exactly what I don’t want from a bank), while O2 are trying to convince us they’re worth joining because of a cat behaving like a dog (which I find rather baffling, as they’re actively eschewing the quiet dignity of cats). Avoiding clichés is an admirable thing, as anyone can tell you, but sometimes I’d rather people erred more on the side of the unoriginal to give a convincing message. As I hope my latest real-world copywriting example will demonstrate.

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This one simple writing tip will waste your time

one simple tipIn my downtime between copywriting tasks, as any budding freelancer should, I scour books and blogs for tips and tactics to better understand the world of content writing. Half of the people on the internet offering advice, it seems, have one incredible tip that could change everything for you. They’re anxious to share it with you, but it’s hidden behind a fortified essay of additional information.
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How not to advertise luxury hotels: copywriting examples

writing, copywriting, freelance, just working, what is a copywriter, copywriting exampleIn an ongoing effort to learn from real world copy, here’s two new advertising copywriting examples. This time, both for the same luxury hotel, both flawed. When advertising luxury goods and services, there’s a tendency for copywriters to use long, fancy words in an attempt to make the product seem sophisticated. And worse, a tendency to use long rambling sentences packed full of unoriginal adjectives. In the previous article I had one example of this style of copy, which did a reasonable job (if vague), but included mistakes. The more common problem with grandiose luxury text, though, is that it comes across as convoluted and messy, and uses forgettable clichés  as you’ll see in these examples. Continue reading